Frederick Douglass: First Editorial of the North Star

(1847)

Frederick Douglass, well-known abolitionist and civil rights activist, began publishing an antislavery weekly in Rochester, New York, on December 3, 1847. In the First Editorial of the North Star, he outlines his reasons for starting his own newspaper. Douglass edited three newspapers between 1847 and 1863. In the first, the North Star, he and other African American reformers (along with some whites) expressed their views concerning slavery. In 1841, Douglass, an escaped slave, had begun acting as a lecturer for white-dominated antislavery societies. William Lloyd Garrison, the most prominent abolitionist in America, brought Douglass into his circle of reformers, where he proved to be a quick study. Garrison was also the most radical of the abolitionists, demanding an immediate, complete, and uncompensated end to slavery. Garrison and his followers rejected the U.S. Constitution as a proslavery document and urged all to avoid organized religion because most denominations...

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Frederick Douglass (Library of Congress)

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